Writer’s Life

human teeth

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Anyone have anything to say?

The fact is that the written word is still using the language.

Writers are:

  1. Just people who have the gift of gab and the time or the patience to do it in writing.
  2.  People who tend to have something to say.  In some cases these are just egocentric people who love attention.  Other times, these are insightful thinkers who have great input.
  3.  Lonely people who want to talk to someone.
  4.  Happy people who prefer to hang out alone more than very extroverted, social people but not nearly as much as most hermits.

Images,

but not in pictures….Novelists: male: Dr. Watson, the narrator and character of the Sherlock Holmes stories.  Neil Gaiman.  Novelists female:  the lady from the TV show ‘Murder she wrote’ and JK Rowling.

Journalists: Walter Kronkite and Barbara Walters.  Next generations: Diane Sawyer and John Stewart.  These are very well dressed, fast-talkers able to do rapid research and behind the scenes are adept at accepting criticism and making editorial changes, on a daily basis, at the office.

Still, we also have the image of the war-correspondent: some nutter who went overseas and dangerous to get 5 minutes on TV.  Some of us still recall that 10 years ago or so, a freelance journalist broke into the mainstream with some of his work over in Iraq and ended up getting offered a “real job at NBC”.   That’s a clue as to how tough it is for freelancers and how many rightly assume that freelancers are people hoping to get a steady job as staff writers.

Freelancers

People doing it for love.  People desperately trying to break into the field.  Hobbyists, who just want to write for fun now and then and are happy to get the occasional ‘prize money’ of being paid for a published item.

Millenials and younger

Women and college students, trying their hand to earn a few bucks doing something cool that can be done while kids are playing around in the house.

These are sometimes poor people who have been trying to earn a living writing for varying amounts of time.  They may be depressed, or drunkards, or totally fascinating people.

YA and Children’s

Either people with decent day jobs or ‘miracle mom’ types who are able to earn a steady living from sales of their books.

People who seem to have won the ‘incredibly successful book lottery’.  When asked, the swear they are overwhelmed and thrilled at the success of their book.  They are now swimming in more money than they know what to do with.  Often it is something like a fuzzy caterpillar book, or a dragon illustrated by previously unknown illustrator and everyone with children the right age for it are reading it and everyone just loves the book.

Staff Writers

People earning a living.  Often the younger ones are financially poor but still have hope.  The older ones are sometimes still poor but many are lower middle class and have a weird vibe because if asked they just have a day job and would never write for anyone who wouldn’t pay them.  These blend in seamlessly with other workers during lunch breaks in big cities when people are out of the office and bustling about.

person holding white paper and typewriter

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