Occultist Freaks Help Cops in Indianapolis

Indianapolis (Fake News)

Indianapolis is fed up with their own drug crime.  When the police have only half of what they need to make a good, clean bust the head Sheriff turns to the Mayor for help.  In this action adventure, a surprising team tackles this serious urban problem.  A young Roman Catholic Priest, a local prize winning cage fighter who doubles as a bounty hunter, and two occultists join the team.  One is a law abiding attorney but the other is one of the city’s most viciously successful career criminals.

Reality or Comic Book Quality? – You decide

As the politicians hide the fact, the assembled team gets to work.  Like the old saying goes, “By hook or by crook,”  the woman burglar proves valuable.  The lawyer, however much readers might have assumed was as much a snake as the thief, is actually a dedicated good guy.  The Priest extols his fetish for law enforcement and the attorney assures everyone not to worry about the crook as she is ‘easily bought’.

Whether at their round table meetings for strutting their stuff or hiding behind curtains in a mansion,  this turns out to be a profound special unit! Readers beware when Father Zachary’s Holy Water is good enough to heal wounds on contact, and the thief has a cop-on-her-take up her sleeve.  Will the Father get to distracted by his urges to save their souls?  Will the burglar’s self-interest ruin everything?  Why is the Internet research so powerful?

Find out the answers to these questions, and more as Skilleas Fog figures out exactly what to order from the weapons companies and the lawyer wears perfectly tailored suits on the crook’s recommendations.

Will the bad guys even know what hit them?  Find out in this action-mystery!  Buy yours now:  The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

Spiritual Book Promo with Chat

Without Rival video

Who the heck is that lady?

Lisa Bevere, during her 50s often unapologetically refers to herself as a Sicilian grandmother.  She is a rather famous Protestant Christian preacher.  She’s American.  She is a wife, a mother and a grandmother.  She has also written a number of books, specializing in Christian inspirational nonfiction.

Writers Again

Because of that, she could call herself a writer and an author without lying.  I don’t know whether or not she thinks of herself that way.

Book Promotions

This means that Lisa Bevere is dealing with book promotion, just like all the other authors.  Like all the other authors, she has a unique way of doing it, but despite the uniqueness, a great deal goes on that is just like all the other book marketing that really works.

Factoids

There is a lot of public speaking involved during which she is the one doing the talking.

There is a significant amount of travel involved with the position.

There was a lot of money poured into the speaking, traveling and other marketing, but that means that all that money now also needs to be brought back in just to break even on the books.  Because she does a lot of preaching, it is theoretically possible that she has saved massive amounts of money on publicity by being allowed to promote her books right along with a series of public speaking engagements (preaching for God in her case) that may be supported financially by the churches who would have had her come and speak had she not written the book….but if they did not let her mention the book, the value of those efforts as book promotion would plummet, but not be totally destroyed.  I do not know if it is that, or if the publishing company just fronted the money for the promotions.

Desires

Like all the other writers, I desire certain kinds of support and outcomes.  The kind of publishing company and publishing contract is tied up in professional desires; aspirations as desires.

Recently, right here online, I have discovered another slew of fellow-authors who are also, often, dealing with trying to promote their work, my work, your work despite smaller budgets and publishing contracts that aren’t “the dream book contract”.

The reality of every profession is more complicated than it seems on the surface and from the outside.  Writing and publishing abide by that same principle.

Writer, Reader, check it out:

I invite you to check out works listing with links to buy .

Unlike many authors, the main editor of both my novels and the little nonfiction philosophy booklet was actually me too.   My works are not all the same genre.  They were not all put out by the same publishing company.

None of them had more than $50,000 put in up front by a publishing company and none of the publishers provided me with any marketing budget whatsoever.

There are other authors around.  You know how it is: in a bookstore, library or online writers group it starts to seem like everyone writes books.  The other day I was reminded by another woman, that not everyone does.

Most of the readers don’t also write books, but some do or will someday.

Magical Realism Novel

The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

Magical Realism: how it differs from fantasy

Some readers have heard of magical realism, and most have heard of the fantasy genre.  Fantasy genre normally includes both a great deal of openly practiced magic, but also species of humanoids that are generally not known to really exist.  In most fantasy genre novels, religious magic, or the supernatural effects of Jesus, are not involved in the plots or characters.

There are fantasy novels that are set on Earth, but a large portion of them are set on worlds invented by the authors.

Magical realism is in stories set here on Earth, and is intended to display more of how the magical arts, and religious miracles occur in a realistic manner.  This realism does imply an intimacy with the real world or a reality that does have religious miracles, and various types of magic and witchcraft.

Magical Realism in The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

In the magical realism novel The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckheadthere is both religious magic and occultism.  The religious magic is Christian; God works through a young Father throughout the novel.  Standing in marked contrast to the kind of magic that manifests through him, is the mysterious behavior and sometimes rites of the 2 of the other characters in the novel.

Compared to the way that magic shows up in fantasy novels, readers may say “there is hardly any magic in this story.”  In fact, that is one of the major points in a one of the published book reviews about this novel.

Readers Tastes

As both an author and an avid reader I realize that people are not always looking for the same thing.  This novel may best suit readers who normally prefer no magic in their fiction novels, or who are skeptical of whether or not any novel with magic in it could ever work for them.

Aside from that, I believe that fans of the magical realism genre would really appreciate this novel and how magic is used in it.

Who’s Tutweiler Buckhead?

Who?

Who is this man?  In truth, that’s the big question that the protagonists want to know.  The cops know a little bit about him, but unlike you, they don’t even know his name.  That’s a slight tease: all you do know is his name…and that’s the one piece of information the cops would most like to have.

The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead  may be one of the first if not only, mystery novels named after the villain.  Perhaps you should chime in on whether or not you feel this makes the novel more attractive, or if you find it misleading, as far as titles are concerned.

The novel is an action adventure story set in the city of Indianapolis, which is where I lived when I wrote the first couple of drafts.

The story is not told from Tutweiler’s perspective.  In fact, if he could respond to this post it would only be to hope that no one notices it or else that no one takes it seriously, because of how much he is evading the Police with some of his activities, but not all of them.

Tutweiler is also honestly not based on any single real-life person but I suppose anyone like Tutweiler might worry that this was about him.  In reality, in my fictions stories, especially novels, each character is a composite of at least 4 different people.  To share a sad joke, the other day I saw a video in which Tai Lopez essentially said this ideal girlfriend is also a composite of at least 3 different women.  While that may be painfully true, I immediately thought of the way that I personally write fiction and how I do that intentionally in the invention of characters for novels…but would not find it so helpful for making myself content within a marriage.

The name is very intentionally exotic.  I think I found his first name doing Internet research about dog breeds while scouting the terrain for potential freelance writing contracts over a decade ago.  Strangely enough, I do recall specifically how I came up with the character’s surname.  I was being paid to write a real estate blog for a little while and through the related research learned that Buckhead is one of the fancier neighborhoods in greater Atlanta, Georgia.  Well, something about it struck me as fitting.

White Collar Criminals

I am willing to divulge, and I hope it’s not a spoiler, that Tutweiler is a white collar type of criminal, but even telling you that I begin to digress into that character’s personal issues that are explained in chapters of the novel.

Everyone who has known or hated white collar criminals will appreciate this.

What’s the plot line?

It’s really about finding out who Tutweiler actually is, and saddling him with the burden of the responsibility for some of his actions.  Mind you, he’s enough of a real person type of villain that there is a lot more to him than just his crimes.

The City of Indianapolis resorts to using a special squad of 4 who are a compromise between the law enforcement agencies and vigilantes.   The 4 are not all alike, which will appeal more to some readers than others.   Three types of people will feel most at home with our protagonists: 1) people who like those crime TV shows like NCIS where there is obviously a team solving a criminal case, 2) fantasy role play gamers who are used to thinking in terms of “adventuring parties”, 3) people who love comic book heroes and heroines.  (old use of the actual feminine form instead of only the masculine grammatical form).  If you or someone you know is any of those types, then you might really like this novel.

Magical Realism

Fans of fantasy might be terribly disappointed by level of magic in The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead.  In fact, here’s a link to a  negative book review – fantasy disappointment.   There is some magic and occultism in the novel, but it does not conform to either sword and sorcery nor to ‘Satanic crimes’ genre expectations.  It may live up to the standards of magical realism.

There is also God related magic in the novel, and in this case, it is done by Christians rather than say Buddhists or Hindus ala Dr. Strange.

Other details

The writing style developed from someone who finds it normal if you take advanced classes in high school or go to college in stark contrast to someone who thought all that would go right over your head.  This is not a book written “at an 8th grade reading level” so that foreigners and kids can feel as if they understand the English language.   Be prepared for relatively long sentences and descriptive sub-clauses.

Interested?

If this sounds like your type of thing, then just scroll on up and click on the link.   The review is also real by the way and not a ‘brain wash positive’ work of paid promotional advertising.

If you go for it, I hope you love it.

I would be thrilled if anyone who reads it would bother to post a comment or a semi-public or public review of the reader’s own free will.

Especially for College Students

Wild Undergraduates

Are you a college student?

Wondering what to get your friends or yourself for the holidays?  Maybe you would like buy someone you like or love something, but don’t want to spend much.

If you, and any of your friends are college students who have Kindles and love to read, have I got good news for you.

Here is a great little set of short fiction stories for just $0.99! :   The Future of Engineering

What’s Special About Them?

You are probably wondering.  Every story in The Future of Engineering collection is about college students.  Starring college students.  Set on university campuses.

These stories are so good, that you may want to get yourself a copy, at $0.99 there’re at a price it’s tough to beat.

Genre and plot line:  diverse:  1 is about a goddess-project; 1 is a comedy story about advanced engineering research and an old saying.  1 is about whether or not anyone died of an overdose of fun the night before.

Nevertheless, these were written by me, when I was a college student during my mid-20s, and everything about them is especially designed for this niche market.

If you do it to buy something for your friends or that sibling who is in college, that’s great.

If you do it because you love yourself…All I can tell you is that I hope your self-love is the healthy kind, rather than narcissism.

How to write characters in fiction

Fiction Writing

Fiction writing is actually a broad category and can apply to TV, radio shows, short fiction, novellas, and of course novels. Plays and screenplays both also involve creating characters. In this article we will take a quick look at what is involved in creating good characters in your work of fiction.

Characterisation

When any of us read excellent fiction, the characters always stand out. Once you look, you will notice that they have enough depth to hold our interest, but are really held together by being exemplars of just a handful of traits. From a personal perspective, I find this easy to relate to because of how much I create my own images or senses of what other real people are like in a similar manner. I know there is greater depth and more detail to each of us, but often a few things are enough.

In creating characters for fiction, realize that the plot and the characters need to go together. If they don’t, you will get quite a bizarre tale or the story won’t go well because your characters are forced to act out of character much of the time in order to drive the plot forward.

Motives

What motivates your characters? Knowing any major life motive can help create the right kind of person for your story. A character may be most motivated by love or by sexual desire, or by money. One might have an intense personal passion and interest. One could be out for revenge or out to save the world. Of course, the lack of motive or unknown motives can be an intentional means of making a mysterious character.

The life motivations and what is driving the character through the story may be different. For example, one could easily have a sexually motivated life motivated character who is driven by the desire to rescue a damsel in distress while working as a police officer in a mystery novel. One could have an artist, motivated to achieve heights of personal self-expression over all but within the story line is motivated by her romantic desires in a romance novel.

Looks

Especially from the movies and television, people are somewhat conditioned about who we see and what we think. How people present themselves for work life and through other means also influence us. So do personal experience and personal preferences. In this case, personal experience includes other stories we have read or watched as plays or TV or film or even know from songs.

Making characters that look right may well come naturally. If you are a new writer, writer’s groups can be a great place to get feedback about what your own characters are like, including the question of whether or not they look right for the part.

As a writer, you have the choice to be intentionally conventional or intentionally unconventional. In reality, for most writers, leave the unconventional until after your career is established.

Tall dark and handsome still means something, but whether dark obviously means a black man or if it means a white man with dark swarthy hair depends. The characters need to fit the environment and the story line.

Other Traits

Your characters may well have professions. Whenever there is a good job match between a person and their profession, the job is a great way to showcase the identity of the character. A character that does not have a good job fit, and is not well represented by their profession may need to be shown to express that somehow – as a hobby or through volunteer work or some other means, or to have some difficulty with the job. A little dialog in bits and pieces might show the person’s colleagues expressing the ill-fitting nature of the job or that something about the person or situation is peculiar or even wrong.

Other qualities that may not be too difficult to express in written fiction: savvy, fear, courage timidity, enthusiasm, unforgiving, kind, impatient, persistent, inconsistent.

Intimacy

The relationship between characterization and plot is so intimate because what your characters do in response to each event is determined by who they are. As simplistic as it sounds it is that the plot of a story and the characters are interdependent.

Dialog within a story is a great way to give your characters more opportunities to express their identities to the readers while also driving the plot of the story forward.

Any other form of intimacy that occurs within the story can be used to reveal the character of the characters – silly as that sounds.

Of course, the secrecy and uncertainty people have about who other people really are is often used in writing. In many mysteries and thrillers the villain is someone who, on the surface, does not appear to be of the same character that he or she really is. In comic book hero stories, the villain is often open and well known for who he or she really is.

Characteristation

Integral to every written work of art involving people and an active story line are characters. The art of creating and portraying characters through the written word is an important part of being a writer and of every story. Some of it may come naturally, but a lot of it can also be learned. Just remember that your plot and your characters need each other.

To see how I did it in an urban novel, just click on the link : The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

Gezka FaucMerz and Kiel Bronson – fictional characters 2014

Gezka FaucMerz, still living as a Captain in the Rejkyavikian Naav thousands of years in our future, or maybe just in alternate universe or both…Icelandic victories against their own corrupt bankers notwithstanding….has finally made it into her life ….being a fiction character nothing happened until the next story that includes her began to take shape.

Despite a variety of difficulties, she is able to reunite in her professional and personal relationship with Kiel Bronson. Kiel does not like what she has dragged him into, but is grateful for the help getting him out of a lengthy punishment explained in their first novel.

Location is everything some say: Gezka’s home base is right around 32Light Years from our Sun, whereas Kiel’s original home is here on planet Earth in the very solar system readers will recognize as where they woke up to find themselves again today – unless they are up in the space station.

The story is set, so far, in the exciting but dirty work of the rough draft of the next novel, in more than one location but mainly from 28 to 31 Light Years from planet Earth’s Sun. Kiel went so far out even Hippies heads are spinning, “laugh out loud”.

Fiction Characters 2014

Character in real life matters a lot, but it also matters in fiction. Character creation, portrayal, description and expression are all meaningful. The nature of the art form being used influences the manner is which character can be known, perceived, understood etc..

We all know some real life characters and some fictional ones. There are also ones we may be overly or insufficiently sure of – mythical figures, gods, heroes, heroines and so on.

Where do we find fictional characters? Books, adventure games, plays, TV shows, movies, the comics and all too often at the office. OK, that last one was a bit cynical, but that’s how it goes.

Recently the big fiction characters in my own life have been the ones for a science fiction novel series that I’m now writing the second novel of for the series and a group of characters used in some Dungeons and Dragons gaming. Yes, I do that even though I am an adult. There was about a decade when I did not but my son likes it – he is imaginative and likes it. He plays online versions way more than I ever did or do, and we both play real time group and have played ‘traditional in person’ style. He likes to create characters. While we don’t deal with it all the same way, we both like creating and using characters in fictional settings. This goes beyond mere observation. I view reading as being between mere observation and the type of enactment and portrayal of stage actors. Movies and TV are a little different because in some ways they work like stage theatre but in other respects they really don’t.

Women’s Luncheons in The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

One of the major characters in The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead is a woman.  Her name is Talitha; no last name is ever given.  She is named after much younger woman I met in real life and there is really almost no other resemblance between them beyond that they are both human females.  The real person is a woman I cared for professionally for a few months while she was a teen.  I actually liked her.  Because I did, I went so far as to name a fiction character after her.  The bad news is, the character I named after her is not very nice.

Women’s Lunch Group

My intention was to explain that the fictional character was included in a neighborhood women’s luncheon group.  At the women’s group – somewhat hoity toity of a very middle class crowd, but not the lower middle class if you get my meaning.  They were not trying to be snobs about it, but their main focus was on having a good neighborhood.  Most of the ladies in the group are married women, but Talitha was not.  She had been but did not have custody of either or her two children.  The other women knew it was a sore point with her and so they didn’t talk about it much.

Double Life

Well, truth be told, Talitha has as much of a double life as Tutweiler Buckhead in the novel for similar sorts of reasons – criminal activities.  For Talitha, it comes down to maintaining the lifestyle in which she was raised which turned out to be different to achieve than she had anticipated growing up.  It means a great deal to her that the other women in the neighborhood have no idea of her criminal activities at all but are very aware that her front lawn is well tended, and that she is well groomed and well dressed.  If anything, that is the real message as experienced by this lady who helps a few men solve a serious crime problem in Indianapolis, despite being crooked herself.

Excited?  Curious?  Buy yours today:  The Double Life of Tutweiler Buckhead

Free Sample: The Future of Engineering * no danger to people above 15 years

The Future of Engineering

  A team of graduate students solves a technical mystery in this futuristic academic setting: see excerpt below.

Disruption struck the engineering laboratory of an English university. Computer screens crackled and went dark. Testers and timers scratched; fuses burst in those bundles of electronic parts. Graduate students gasped and cursed. Students looked away from their projects to their comrades.

“Did you just lose power?” they asked each other.Office doors swung wide. The advanced students and those with the prestige of office space squinted up to the glowing neon lights and cursed in a variety of languages. None of them were British.

“It’s the storm,” suggested an undergraduate working on her final project.A German man glowered. “Storm? There is no storm.”

“Have you been outside recently?” the young woman replied. “Have you even been near a window leading to the outside world?”

The young German man with the office without windows frowned.“No, I haven’t.”